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Matrix_Professional Collaborations


Projects

 

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Matrix_Professional Collaborations


Projects

 

Rockwell Group

The Rockwell Group is a 250+ person design firm with main studios in New York City and additional offices in Madrid and Shanghai, producing multiple types of projects, including hospitality, cultural, educational, and residential. We pride in our curiosity, our talented team, and our ability to generate meaningful spaces for users.

I have had the fortune of contributing to the following projects while working with the Rockwell Group, in New York City. Some of these I participated while as a design intern in the Fall of 2014, and others now as a full-time architectural designer.  

Full Work. 


Tijuana Parasol

This parasol project was a social & urban built initiative by Amorphica to mitigate the lack of public spaces in one of Tijuana’s communities.

Camino Verde is a low-income, 30,000 person community in Mexico with the 2nd highest violence-rate in the country. It was established in 1984 by immigrants that settled in the outskirts of Tijuana and has grown into the urban chaos that it is today. Our project was to design a public space which would help mitigate the violence by offering neighborhoods a built identity and foster interaction with different habitants. To do so, we recycled old tires, which are abandoned near the site, washed, painted, and assembled the component for a parasol with a very limited budget.

Tijuana, Mexico

Status: In-progress

Contribution: Project Architect

Phase: Concept to Construction

Summer 2014

Collaborators: Tatiana Perez, Roberto Gutierrez

Supervisors: Julia Cerrud, Aaron Gutierrez


NASA Campus

The NASA campus project was part of Cornell University’s partnership with Ten Arquitectos as part of the AAP New York City program. Architects from Enrique Norten’s Taller were instructors to a studio in Manhattan. The task was to look at NASA and what it meant to be a part of it.

For our analysis, we understood the NASA identity to be that of collaboration, innovation, and discovery. This architectural project capitalizes on the evident sub-communities that exist in the current NASA campus in Cleveland, OH, and proposes five distributed interventions as opposed to s a single building. The notion of scale drives this design as even within each of the five interventions, the space is fragmented so as to provide as many experiences as possible while offering users a single dwelling for congregation.

Cleveland, OH & New York City, NY

Fall 2014

Collaborators (analysis): Aymar Marino-Maza, Willow Hong, Vincent Parlatore

Instructors: Andrea Steele, James Carse

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Matrix_Architecture


Academic

Projects

 

Matrix_Architecture


Academic

Projects

 

These projects were completed as part of Cornell University's undergraduate program in Architecture, from 2010 to 2015 in Ithaca, New York. 

Architecture Portfolio


Cornell Tech Campus

Spring 2013

Roosevelt Island, New York

Instructor: Arthur Ovaska

SOM's master plan for the Cornell Tech site appears to have one major flaw - every building

is being designed independently from each other and as it is being developed, does not possess the qualities of a campus. This project suggests connections amongst the campus’ buildings through plazas and internal circulation. In addition, the scale of each ''cluster'' resembles that of a typical Manhattan block, referencing the neighboring context.

 


Flaminia Transit Station

Rome, Italy

Fall 2014

Instructors: Caroline O-Donnell, Giorgio Martocchia

An opportunity to challenge the norm of parking garages by exploring the intersection of vertical and horizontal planes, creating interstitial spaces in between. This transit station services the chaotic crowds arriving and exiting the nearby Olympic Stadium.


Owego Town Hall

Owego, New York

Spring 2012

Collaborators: Maria Tsvetkova, Thomas Tumelty

Contributions: Ryan White

Instructor: Dana Cupkova 

The topography of Owego makes it a town likely to flood in the event of a major rain downfall because of its river. To build a town hall on this site, it only makes sense to raise the structure and allow for the water to freely move underneath it. A single dwelling cannot stop a floor; and if anything a barrier would send the water to the adjacent properties. Instead, this project accepts the tragic nature of an inundation. The rest of the time, the ground level of the town hall serves as a public walkway connecting the townspeople with the river-walk. 


Johnson Pavilion

Ithaca, New York

Spring 2011

Instructor: Yehre Suh, Dagmar Richter

The Johnson Pavilion is a proposal adjacent to the Johnson Museum at Cornell University. This project challenged the orthogonal qualities of the adjacent museum and proposed an alternative experience for a gallery use. 


Museum of Unexpected

Binghamton, New York

Fall 2011

Instructor: Vincent Mulcahy

An approach to manifesting the unexpected in design can also be through the unfamiliar. This museum was designed solely with section drawings, and immediately translated into a physical model. The site in Binghamton has debris remaining from a factory fire and is also prone to flooding.


Structural Systems

Ithaca, New York

Spring 2013

Materials & Properties: Physical Model. 1/16” : 1’-0” Scale. Brass, wood, rockite.

Resources: CNC Milling, 3D-Prining, Laser-Cutting.

Collaborator: Benjamin Waters. See his work here.

Instructor: Mark Cruvellier

The uncertainty of this project made it a fun process. Extreme coordination and communication was required to recreate the structure of the 2012 London Aquatic Centre. This physical model demonstrates the incredibly strong properties of steel in construction.


Body Armor

Ithaca, New York

Fall 2010

Instructor: Yehre Suh, Dagmar Richter 

‘Body Armor’ was the first time I studied space in relationship to the body. Back then, however, I did not understand the execution and potentials of designing in such a way due to my lack of experience. The task was to create an ‘armor’ of some type and have it mediate between the user (my body) and a specific site (in my case, the studio bleachers at Cornell University). The strongest part of this project was the representation and studies. However, the execution came short as the physical construction of the armor would have required more time and resources for proper installation in its site. 


Point to Volume

Ithaca, New York

Fall 2010

Instructor: Yehre Suh, Dagmar Richter 

The following architectural investigation focuses on the concepts of point, line, surface, volume, and void (in that order). I was given the task to generate a 3D space out of a 2D exercise, pushing the project through various mediums of representation: hand-drafting, software drawing, photography, and model-making. 

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Matrix_Hospitality


Hospitality

 

Matrix_Hospitality


Hospitality

 

Specializing in hospitality has always been a top priority. However, this does not mean constricting to only building hotels. A project can be richer when programs are challenged and we question what a hotel experience truly is and how it can be informed by other building types. Even further, how the hotel experience can enhance other building-type programs. 

Hospitality Portfolio


Hotel Ezra Cornell

Statler Hotel, Ithaca, New York

Spring 2013

Collaborators Brianna Yang, Chloe Chan

HEC is a student organization which operates the hotel for a weekend, hosting conferences, dinners, and alumni networking events. This was an opportunity to experiment with reversing the properties of objects that traditionally make a dinning experience. Instead of having floral arrangements on the tables, invert them by having them descend from the ceiling and stop right before reaching the guests.


Apperception

North Island, New Zealand

Collaborator: Chelsey Garman

Spring 2013

CONCEPT

The incessant need of establishing mediums of merging people with landscapes has forced the creation of statement icons such as resorts and immense complexes in sites that should in fact remain true to their topography; precisely what makes them a desirable landscape.

This project is an attempt in transporting the users to and through the natural environment while minimizing the footprint through two means: firstly, by re-using existing tracks of railroad and the addition of sidings, supplemental tracks, and secondly, by making the experience temporal instead of permanent.

Triggered by the train car condition of a wagon, the suite is a movable space that travels on top of tracks. It remains orthogonal as an initial form. Considering the spatial limitations, the functionality and comfort of the space are priority. It would be a light structure as most of the envelope of it would be glass but with a supporting steel frame to allow for wind loads and enough insulation from the different climates.

GUESTS

Apperception is designed to appeal to the adventure travelers. It enables those travelers to explore and experience the land without all of the hassle they currently have to deal with, such as taking luggage with them or spending multiple hours a day traveling to the destination that they wish to explore. They could gain freedom and more time to explore and learn if they choose to travel while they are sleeping, or they can choose to sit in their room and watch the landscape pass by as they relax.

It gives adventure travelers the opportunity to explore no matter what stage they are in life. It is hard for a family with two small children to travel across a new land because of all of the special care that the children need, or for an elderly couple who starts to have health problems or just do not want to deal with the stress of moving to multiple locations in a foreign country. This allows adventure travelers to become more efficient and less stressed.

EXPERIENCE

The guests will experience a time in which they are immersed in the beauty of the nature of a country, and where they are able to explore and roam freely without worrying about how they will get all the way back to their hotel. They will be fully submersed in the country when they explore by day and enjoy the view from their window at night. They will see the beauty that the country has to offer, all while having the opportunity to experience culture and local foods when they explore small towns and large cities. The moods of relaxation, excitement, curiosity, and amazement will be very common throughout the entire trip.

SERVICING

Since the guestrooms will be mobile, there will be port stations scattered throughout the land where the guestrooms are able to be serviced. The ports will be mainly at the destinations so the rooms can be maintenance while the guest is exploring. The ports will fill the room’s water tanks, empty the waste tanks, fuel the engine, and offer the guest different cuisine options including local cultural items.

ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY

There are three engineering and technology features that are keys in tying the concept together.

The most important piece of technology that will be used is a central control system. This system will be monitoring and controlling the movement of the rooms. This central hub will be able to see train schedules, and the locations of all of the rooms and any point in time. The controllers will be responsible for telling the computerized guestrooms when to move, what direction to move, and how fast to move. Similar to the job of an air traffic controller in the concept of preventing collisions of the guestrooms, and making sure the tracks are clear before the room moves. Along with controlling the movement of the rooms, the central control system will also be able to monitor the condition of each one of the rooms. The computer controls in the room will continuously send information to these locations. Human monitors would be able to see fuel levels, water levels, and engine conditions.

In order to help the guest, there will be an internal security system in the room that will not allow it to move if everyone is not in the room. There will be an approval system that will need the fingerprint of everyone that is staying in the room right before the room is able to move, however there can be exceptions made if the guests have very small children. With this system in place, the rooms will not leave without the guests if for some reason they are not in the room when they are scheduled to leave.

Another feature that will be included for the comfort of the guest is switchable smart glass. All of the glass used in the exterior will be able to be turned on and off. If the guest wants to see everything around them they can have clear glass, but if they decide they want privacy then can flip a switch and the glass is no longer able to be seen through. By using this technology, the guest has full control of the experience that they want out of their journey.


Hotel of Memory

Roosevelt Island, New York

Thesis Advisors: Werner Goehner, Andrew Lucia

Spring 2015

Our mind is extremely important in spatial memory – any time we enter a new place, our brain interprets our environment and takes physical cues to assemble a mental field map. This map remains archived in the deep recesses of our mind and is retrieved when, if ever, we enter the same space again.

Yet, experiencing architecture is not only about mapping our environment; for our brain, it is more about the relationships amongst the physical objects surrounding us. We remember based on those relationships. It makes perfect sense to test this notion in a hospitality setting, where guests are encouraged to remember their lodging experience for years, often with only a single-night stay.

This thesis challenges architecture to learn from spatial memory and navigatory relationships to design with more careful, corporeal considerations. The hotel operates as a testing field for memory since guests often get a limited time to become familiar with their environments, pressuring design to offer an experience that will remain in the user’s mind long-term. Through the graphic abstraction of architectural informational present in the Queensboro Bridge and Statler Hotel, this embodied hotel design engages guests with the site through experiential, both physical and mental, cues.

Architecture school teaches us how to interpret landscapes, urban contexts, history, and art. Interpreting the brain mechanisms of those who occupy our spaces is just as important in responsible design.   

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